montclarelab:

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Recently, I was intrigued to learn that rivers operate in a state of equilibrium. Rivers alter two independent variables, their sinuosity, or channel pattern, and slope to maintain a delicate equilibrium. Why would a science and engineering student like me find that surprising?…

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montclarelab:

I am Science: CHEMISTRY and COMICS
My first love has and always will be chemistry. However shortly thereafter I fell in love with a guy that owned a comic book store. After graduating as a chemistry major in college, we got married and I started my PhD. While in graduate school, I attended comic book conventions helping my husband sell comic books and toys . I had attended more comic book conventions than chemistry /science conventions … The balance has changed now tipping in favor of science.
Subsequently earning my phd in bioorganic chemistry, my husband sold his shop and followed me to CA so I could carry out my postdoc. He took up freelance editing and landed a job as an editor for DC comics in NY..fortunately I was able to secure a faculty position in NY. Now he is a freelance comic book writer and I am leading an awesome group of bright young scientists /engineers.
I am science. 
PS. Comic book conventions and scientific conferences are very similar—-the only difference is that you are likely to find yourself standing in line next to someone dressed up as storm trooper!
Jin Montclare

montclarelab:

I am Science: CHEMISTRY and COMICS

My first love has and always will be chemistry. However shortly thereafter I fell in love with a guy that owned a comic book store. After graduating as a chemistry major in college, we got married and I started my PhD. While in graduate school, I attended comic book conventions helping my husband sell comic books and toys . I had attended more comic book conventions than chemistry /science conventions … The balance has changed now tipping in favor of science.

Subsequently earning my phd in bioorganic chemistry, my husband sold his shop and followed me to CA so I could carry out my postdoc. He took up freelance editing and landed a job as an editor for DC comics in NY..fortunately I was able to secure a faculty position in NY. Now he is a freelance comic book writer and I am leading an awesome group of bright young scientists /engineers.

I am science.

PS. Comic book conventions and scientific conferences are very similar—-the only difference is that you are likely to find yourself standing in line next to someone dressed up as storm trooper!

Jin Montclare

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Excerpt:

Has science changed your life? Tell us your story!

At HuffPost, we’re kicking off an exciting new project, and we’d love you to participate. It’s called “The Moment I Knew,” a user-submitted video series where readers tell the stories of life-changing moments they have experienced. Each section of HuffPost has chosen a different theme — whether it was the moment you knew you were in love, the moment you knew your marriage was over, the moment you knew you loved college, or the moment you knew you were broke. You can also tell us about any other life-defining moment you’d like to share. The possibilities are endless!

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Excerpt:

Dr. Darleane Hoffman, a career actinide chemist who will be 86 years old this year. That’s right—Dr. Hoffman earned a Ph.D. in nuclear chemistry in 1951. NINETEEN FIFTY-ONE! This daughter of a high school principal and a music teacher was inspired to science by a female chemistry professor. In those days, women were not typically found in the science classroom, but the future Dr. Hoffman found her mentor.

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jtotheizzoe:

Adopt a Graduate Student

I mean, JUST LOOK AT THEM.

Tear …

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Excerpt:

How can we change this stereotypical perception and encourage girls and women to follow their passion and take up science as a career? One way is to provide more and better role models of female scientists, both in traditional print media and online. A great resource is the website “Making women visible online” by the UKRC. This website offers guides and codes of good practice for websites and online communities, as well as studies and statistics on gender equality in science, engineering and technology. It also provides interesting links to opinion pieces and websites featuring the voices of female scientists, such as the GetSETWomen Blog and the UKRC Women Bloggers list. Another great resource specific to Plant Sciences is the “Women in Plant Science” website by the ASPB (American Society of Plant Biologists).

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Excerpt: 

Scientists don’t really wear white lab coats. They usually don’t stand in front of old cabinets full of glass jars and beakers containing a rainbow of colored liquids. Unless someone has had an unfortunate bunsen burner accident it is unlikely that there is smoke wafting through the lab, or beakers bubbling over with a frothy white foam. If these images are what come to mind when you think of scientist, you need an update. It isn’t your fault, either.

Taking pictures or video to accompany my stories, I’ve had to ask myself how can I make a shot look more…sciencey? In the media we do a great disservice to scientists every time we stick them in the white coat peering into a microscope. Not that scientists don’t peer into microscopes, they do. But the stereotype has been allowed to run roughshod over every scientific discipline to the point where people barely recognize scientists who don’t fit the stereotype. Most scientists don’t fit the stereotype. But I’ve still dragged interviewees around a building until I find a suitable science looking backdrop. We all do it, and we need to stop.

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So, when you were young, what did you want to be when you grew up? Was the answer always “ecologist”? I doubt it, unless one of your parents was an ecologist. So, if not an ecologist, what did you want to be?

Lot’s of stories in the comments!

Excerpt:

I was a fish out of water, I was a stranger in a strange land. The graduate school thing proved to be harder than I had ever imagined. I was alone, isolated and intimidated. I felt that all the wonderful moments I had the summer before my first graduate seminar was slipping fast from my memory and this new thing was a reality that I could not grasp. I struggled with my readings, I froze when it came to time to write up assignments, I gasped for air when I thought about how I would communicate in the next group meeting or social event. I felt as if I was drowning – I reached longingly for the past. I kept in touch with my folks still at Virginia State University, I called home a lot (more than I had as an incoming freshman in college), I spent time at my internship at the Colonial Williamsburg Department of Archaeological Research Lab, much more than I was required to. And I cried a lot.

#iamscience 9th grade not smart enough for bio. 12th grade don’t cry when you fail calc. now MS physics & MA anthro
@BradyburyCynthia

(Source: twitter.com)